Posts Tagged ‘MS River Flooding’

Rivers Flow to the Sea

MS River Mouth

Gravity is a fundamental law of nature.  It makes rivers flow to the sea.  If the natural flow is blocked, there are consequences. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers blocked about 40% of the Mississippi River’s peak flow to the Gulf at Morgan City in 1964.  The delayed consequences today are unnatural floods on the Lower Mississippi. 

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Deja Vu All Over Again

Deja Vu All Over Again

On January 15, 2016, the Mississippi River at Vicksburg reached 50 feet — 7 feet above flood stage.  It was the highest January crest since 1879 when Congress put the Mississippi River Commission (MRC) and the US Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) in charge of flood control.  A freak January flood.  It caused the Mississippi deer season to close early along the river.

It happened again this year.  On January 12-13, the river reached flood stage at Vicksburg and Greenville.  And the deer season closed early.  “Deja vu all over again,” as Yogi Berra said.  The river has reached flood stage in January only three times in 140 years — but twice in the last three years.

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Flood Control and Insanity

Flood Control and Insanity

The Mississippi River is usually low in the fall.  But it reached 42 feet at Natchez this month and flooded unharvested crops.  It has risen steadily since the 1950’s when the highest fall crest was 28 feet.

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Bureaucrats All the Way Down

Black Swan - Bureaucrats

Bureaucrats default to the 1928 Mississippi River and Tributaries Project flood control plan even though it causes record floods. They ignore the bottlenecks, declare 900,000 acres flooded inside the levees a non-event, default to dredging and raising levees — and hope no Black Swan (a rare event with extreme consequences) happens on their watch.

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Tip of a Mudberg

The Titanic ran into an iceberg.  And sank.  The US Army Corps of Engineers has run into a “Mudberg.”  And its reputation is sinking.  Mudberg is a thirty-foot-high mound of sediments in the Mississippi River above Baton Rouge that restricts its flow.  It slows the discharge to the Gulf of what were beneficial short, spring rises on the river.  And makes them long, destructive floods.

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