Does Occupational Licensing Help Us?

It is easy to think that it would be good to get professional service from someone who is government-certified. Licensing and certification seem to add an official stamp of approval, as it were, that a person is reliable and capable of doing a job (though this may not always be the case). But a closer…

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Group Protests Financial Burden of Kemper

On Tuesday evening, Mississippians for Affordable Energy protested the financial burden that Kemper County coal plant would place on ratepayers. They held signs with slogans such as “We can’t afford Kemper” and “No Cronyism.” WTOK reports that on Tuesday evening, Mississippians for Affordable Energy protested the financial burden that Kemper County coal plant would place…

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Use It or Lose It

“Use it or lose it” causes a flurry of federal spending in September, as highlighted in an article by the Washington Post. Government agencies rush to spend the rest of the money in their budget before they lose it with the turn of the calendar. An extra incentive is that any money they don’t spend…

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Subsidies Work!

Opponents of federal aid and other forms of subsidy often base their objections on “the fact that subsidies won’t work.” Unfortu­nately for their argument, subsi­dies do work, and that is a major reason why they are objectionable. Opponents of federal aid and other forms of subsidy often base their objections on “the fact that subsidies…

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Do Vouchers Hurt Integration? Maybe Not…

The U.S. Department of Justice filed suit that Louisiana vouchers were hindering integration efforts in Louisiana. A study suggests otherwise. According to EducationNext, since 2012 the publicly-funded Lousiana Scholarship Program (LSP) has allowed thousands of low-income students across that state to leave low-performing public schools and go to local private schools. Sound good? Not to…

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When $200 Means You Can’t Talk

It’s funny how someone spending only $200 to promote a political issue could have been obliged to spend extra just for legal counsel. And it is hard not to conclude that such technical laws are put in place to discourage regular people who just want to promote their ideas. What happens if you pay more…

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A Tiny Wind in the World’s Energy Sails

If renewables don’t cut it as an alternative energy source, we have to meet the demand in other ways. Could this mean that renewable doesn’t equal sustainable?Let’s not let the wind get knocked out of us by overly relying on the wrong power source. 32, 1, 30, 1/2. Robert Bryce of the Manhattan Institute lists…

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Comparative Advantage: Free Trade Benefits High-Paid U.S. Workers

Understanding comparative advantage has the same effect on concerns about free trade as water had on the Wicked Witch of the West. Free trade with other countries (regardless of how much or little their workers are paid) doesn’t increase unemployment or lower wages. Indeed, one of the best ways of increasing the wages of U.S.…

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Will New Superintendent Unleash Mississippi Education Potential?

Mississippi has hired Dr. Carey Wright as its first (permanent) female superintendent of education. As Wright’s administration gets into swing, it will be interesting to see what unleashing that “untapped potential” looks like in Mississippi. Last Wednesday, Mississippi hired Dr. Carey Wright as its first (permanent) female superintendent of education. Wright holds a Master’s of…

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The Giant Machine

If we have decided that it’s society’s responsibility to help those in need, then do we not also have an obligation to make sure our support systems are NOT giant, costly bureaucracies removed from the real human beings? Would more local support be better? An article from The Economist questions how to “balance the desire…

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